Category Archives: Articles

Sandwich Soul Benefit Concert

The Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust Proudly Presents a Fund Raiser for Sandwich Soul

Sandwich Soul Holiday Concert

Saturday, December 9th

7 p.m.

Glass Town Stage, Sandwich Town Hall, 130 Main St. Sandwich

Tickets $15 and they are on sale now at Sandwich Town Hall and Splash Stationers, 126 Route 6A

Box Office will be open at 6:00 p.m. and the House will open at 6:40 p.m.

The Concert is part of Sandwich’s Wonderful Holly Days

Sandwich High School’s very own show choir – Sandwich Soul, is under the choral direction of Melinda Lasit, and under the theatrical direction and choreography by Kevin Lasit. The show choir is now going on their sixth year, and within the past five years, the group has become an award winning show choir taking first place with superior and excellent ratings consecutively at local choral festivals and competitions, and last year, Sandwich Soul took the over-all highest points award for the choral music category in New England.

Sandwich Soul was also highlighted on the television show Chronicle as part of the town of Sandwich’s arts and cultural district. Sandwich Soul also does many local performances for the community of Sandwich such as singing the National Anthem for Memorial Day and the DeConto Memorial Road Race, several holiday performances at Heritage Museum and Gardens, and an annual performance at Sandwich’s Holly Days and First Night of Sandwich.

Sandwich Soul was also highlighted at the town of Sandwich’s 375th year celebration and ceremonies and sang the national anthem at a Boston Celtics nationally televised game. The show choir has toured to NYC and participated in Disney’s Broadway Musical Theatre workshop and also participated in an international choral festival taking first place. Soul has toured to Orlando, Florida, where they performed a medley from the musical Wicked, in an international choral festival, where they took first place with a superior rating. They also participated in a highly acclaimed accredited Disney Broadway workshop.

An Evening with Jessica Curran and Friends

Saturday, November 25th at 7 p.m.

Glass Town Stage at Town Hall

130 Main Street, Sandwich, MA

Tickets are $15

On Sale now at Town Hall and Splash Stationery

Box Office will open 1 hour before the curtain
The House will open at 6:40 p.m.
For information call 508-776-3256
No reserved seating

The Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust and Theatre of Sandwich proudly presents vocalist Jessica Curran and Friends, Saturday 25 November, 7 p.m. on the Glass Town Stage at Sandwich Town Hall, 130 Main St. Sandwich. The concert will benefit the artist and Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust. Tickets are on sale now at Sandwich Town Hall, and at Slash Stationers, 126 MA-6A. The box office will open at 6:00 p.m. and the House will open at 6:40 p.m. There is no reserved seating.

Ms. Curran is a 2012 graduate of Sandwich High School who earned a Cape and State reputation as a superb vocalist performing with the swing band Stage Door Canteen and various other groups while still in High School along with competing as a vocalist throughout High School. Her versatility spans jazz, funk, pop, and rock. She studied jazz, voice, and performance at the University of Northern Texas before continuing her studies at Kungl, Musikhogskoln in Stockholm Sweden. Currently based in Stockholm, Jessica not only sings jazz standards from the American Songbook, but arranges for a multitude of colorful instrumentation and is being commissioned for her writing ability. Most notably, Jessica had the opportunity to musically interpret the Nobel Prize in Economics for Stockholm’s Nobel Museum in 2016. She has just launched her premiere album of original songs, “Here,” which she has also arranged. Jessica is a true musical collaborator performing with musicians in Europe and beginning this month appearing in various locations in the USA. Her first Album has been very well received.

From “Sounds So Beautiful” – “Blends of jazz, Latin Dance, Soul and Funk, the album is thriving. You can feel the thrill and her cheerful personality in tracks like Grounded, catchy with the rhythmics, and feel as well the fears and anxieties in songs like Night Visions. Rich is the instrumentation with the strings and percussion. As if her lead vocals weren’t enough, the presence of the violin emphasizes the idea of lightness and weightlessness. Inspired by any shape or form of art (dancing, painting,…) she put out an enjoyable and beautiful piece of work, pure result of creativity.”

The Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust and Theatre of Sandwich are so happy to bring Jessica to the Glass Town Stage in her home town. Tickets are selling already. Jessica’s amazing voice and musical art is something rare and beautiful. Please plan to attend.


Silent Film Series

SilentMovieNightHeaderTHANK YOU!!

This is the fifth and last season of Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust’s silent film series which recreates the original silent film atmosphere: live piano accompaniment by John Read on the historic 1894 silent film piano; pre-movie introduction by Liisa Niemi dressed as a flapper; and the original restored Sandwich Town Hall second floor where silent films were shown beginning in 1915.

 

Classic Silent Films with Live Piano Accompaniment:

The Sandwich Town Hall transforms back into its origins as an early 1900s film auditorium (see articles, below) with special screenings of classic silent films, complete with John Read of Yarmouth playing piano accompaniment and Liisa Niemi of Mansfield offering pre-movie narration dressed as a flapper. John and Lisa are enthusiastic supporters of this unique art style.

Continuing its celebration of the oldest running Town Hall in Massachusetts the volunteer group Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust (the recent winners of the 2011 Massachusetts Historical Commission Award) are presenting this acclaimed film series to support the stewardship of this historical 1834 building.


The Sandwich Town Hall Silent Film Series

By Anthony Basile, WickedLocal.com & Jonathan Shaw (edited)

In 1915 or a little later silent movies began to be shown in the Town Hall and a piano, an upright in the Mission style made by Jacob Doll & Sons for the Frederick Piano Company, was acquired by the town.  It was played by local residents, Minne Bunker Wimmer, Eva May Harlow, and Mary Haines Morrow, to accompany the silent movies.

The hall’s past as a silent movie venue lives on as the original piano is still in use.  The accompaniment is by Yarmouth resident John Read, an experienced pianist and organist who plays without sheet music.

“I grew up when soap operas had live organ music and memorized the theme songs and styles of the various organists on the shows,” Read said. “At the same time I learned thousands of popular songs. This combination comes in handy when I accompany silent movies in that I can draw upon songs that fit the action, as well as appropriate mood music.”

The shows begin with an introduction to place the classic films in their historical context. Liisa Niemi is an IBM manager by day but in her free time she collects antiques and curios from the 1920s. Drawing on her knowledge of the period, Niemi regularly introduces silent films soundtracked by Read. To add authenticity to her presentation, Niemi wears the clothes of a Twenties flapper.

The plan to bring the town hall back to its movie house past began with Town Hall Preservation Trust member Jonathan Shaw. Upon seeing Read and Niemi’s silent movie showcase, Shaw brought the idea back to the organization, who selected it as a companion to the restored building’s annual event, an old time radio radio-styled variety show.

Between the variety show and the silent film, the town hall has played host to vintage entertainment since its re-opening. The shows’ tickets serve as a source of funds for the continued upkeep of the space. The focus on old-fashioned events draws attention to the building’s history, which stretches back to 1834. The latest renovations brought the building up to date as a community venue while keeping its interior consistent with its original design.

The Silent Film Series is now in its fourth season.

 


The Piano, the Projectionist and the Preservation

In 1915 or a little later silent movies began to be shown in the Town Hall and a piano, an upright in the Mission style made by Jacob Doll & Sons for the Frederick Piano Company, was acquired. It was played by local residents, Minne Bunker Wimmer, Eva May Harlow, and Mary Haines Morrow, to accompany the silent movies.

The projectionist turned the film by a hand-crank illuminated by a carbon-arc. A primitive generator located in a garage across the street from the Town Hall provided the electricity. Nonetheless using a carbon-arc projector was dangerous business and likely to set a building on fire. To protect the Town Hall from fire, the projectionist was provided with a urinal and required to remain continuously on duty when the carbon-arc was running. It is said that occasionally the engine of the generator would fail, the screen would dim, and boos and hisses would arise from the audience who had paid a nickel to attend.

 READ MORE ABOUT THE HISTORIC PIANO…

The Sandwich Town Hall reflects over 175 years of Sandwich’s history, government and culture as well as the larger issues of State and National life that have had an impact on the Sandwich community. The Town Hall has been in active use as the seat of Town government for every one of those 175 years. There are few towns that can make this claim.

In 2009 the entire building was restored to its former glory. The second floor ballroom is particularly beautiful with its historically accurate stenciling of tan and brown paint and gold leaf, theatrical stage, balcony seating and fully restored historic shuttered windows. Once again, the second floor is used for movies and theatrical productions.

The Sandwich Town Hall, within the newly designated Glass Town Cultural District, was granted a Preservation Award for Rehabilitation & Restoration by the Massachusetts Historical Commission in 2011.


lloyd_safety_last400

A great time was had by all!  The feature film was “Safety Last” with Harold Lloyd’s famous clock routine.

The short “Coney Island” with Fatty Arbuckle and Buster Keaton was also shown.

Piano-player extraordinaire John Read and “Flapper” Lisa Niemi were terrific!

This comedy classic was highly successful and critically hailed, and it cemented Lloyd’s status as a major figure in early motion pictures. It is still popular at revivals, and it is viewed today as one of the great film comedies.

The film’s title is a play on the common expression, “safety first,” which places safety as the primary priority to avoid accidents. Lloyd performed some of his climbing stunts despite losing a thumb and forefinger in an accident while making a film four years earlier.

Projects

Special Projects:

We thank all our members without whom the following Special Projects wound not have been possible:

TOWN HALL SPECIAL PROJECTS YEAR COST
Christmas Tree 2011 $106.24
Door Plaque 2012 $104.13
Light for piano 2012 $65.86
Round top tables 2012 $500.00
Signage for Cultural District 2012 $100.00
Event floor sign for entryway (indoor) 2012 $375.05
Outdoor display sign 2013 $276.42
Clock 2013 $53.85
Adams Art Grant Match 2013 $350.00
Restriction Brass Panel 2014 $143.44
Repair/tune piano 2014 $515.00
Hall Divider 2014 $429.00
Adams Art Grant Match 2014 $350.00
Piano Restoration 2015 $3,519.84
Repair/tune piano 2015 $410.00
Black Stage Partitions 2016 $978.00
Plaque for historic piano 2016 $161.63
Grand Piano 2016 $1,488.25
Tune Piano 2016 $175.00
TOTAL $10,101.71

Current Members:

Don & Suzanne Bayley
Barbara Buchenan
Joe Carlson
Richard & Donna Claytor
Kathy Coggeshall
Bill & Jerry Collins
Paula Comerford
Carolyn Crowell
John & Janet Czarnetzki
William & Patricia Daley
Marilyn & Doug Dexter
Jane Ellis
Patrick & Jane(Cournoyer) Ellis
Kathy Ellis Knowles
Melissa Frankel
Joseph & Melinda Gallant
Madlyn & Paul Giberti
Jean M. Gile
John & Therese Goodchild
Linell Grundman
Charlotte Hart
Charleen Johnson
Bob King
Jonathan Leonard
Frank MacDonald
Melanie MacMillan
Diane Martin
Kaethe McGuire
Woody & Patti Mitchell
Russell & Katherine Norton
Frank & Lorraine Pannorfi
Elizabeth & James Radloff
Sue Scheible
Jonathan & Eugenie Shaw
Carol Thwaits
Louise Toler
Virginia Veras
Susan & John Vibberts
Carolyn Weimar
Sheila & Bob Wentworth
Joanne Westerhouse
Paul & Karen White
Tobin Wirt

Membership in the Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust helps to support the stewardship of the historic 1834 Sandwich Town Hall and to perpetuate the Sandwich Town Hall as a major cultural, functional, and historic asset of the Town of Sandwich.

Members will receive an annual report about the activities of  the Town Hall Preservation Trust and e-mails of up-coming public programs planned at the Town Hall.

  • Individual————————————————-$15.00
  • Family——————————————————$25.00
  • Patron—————————————————–$100.00
  • 1834 Club————————————————$250.00

JOIN US

Membership Information, Donations & Gifts

To join with a credit card,CLICK HERE

Printable Membership Form

Our Mission:

The Mission of the Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust is to support the continued stewardship of the historic Sandwich Town Hall, to assist the Town Manager and staff as a resource for volunteers, events, and programs, to provide, if feasible, funds for special purposes, and to make recommendations for the perpetual protection and enhancement of the Sandwich Town Hall as a major cultural, functional, and historic asset of the Town of Sandwich and the Commonwealth.

 

Grand Piano Donation

As you know, the Sandwich Town Hall has an 1894  piano with a rich history associated with the Hall. It was the original instrument that was used to accompany the silent movies that were shown in the Hall during the 1920s, and even earlier. It is owned and maintained by the town and the Sandwich Town Hall Trust uses it during our Silent Film series which we produce every year. It is also a key component of the Town Hall Radio Musical Show as it adds to the flavor of those performances. While this piano if a wonderful piece of history, it is not designed to be a concert instrument.

We thank Mary Coleman for donating this wonderful piano! Here’s Mary performing for us in January, 2017. (Click for larger view)

The Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust is proud to announce that it has recently acquired a baby grand piano which will allow for the presentation of professional concerts. It was generously given by Mary Coleman a resident from Eastham who wanted it “to be used in the furtherance of good music on the Cape.” It is a beautiful 5′ 8″, 1990 Yamaha piano with a polished ebony finish which has been lovingly cared for and is in superb condition. The piano was originally purchased in Sandwich 27 years ago and its history has come full circle as it now in our Town Hall courtesy of Mary’s generosity. It is our plan to work with the Sandwich Arts Alliance and other groups to encourage musical productions using this grand piano.

The Trust has paid the cost to have it moved and absorbed additional costs to have it supported with a dolly on wheels so that it can be easily and safely moved across the 1834 Town Hall floor. A cover has also been purchased for its protection. The Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust has accepted the ownership and the Trust will pay for future piano maintenance and tunings. Sandwich officials have agreed to have it kept in the Hall.

We are excited about this and thank you, our members, for your support without which we would not be able to carry out our Mission Statement “…the perpetual protection and enhancement of the Sandwich Town Hall as a major cultural, functional and historic asset of the Town of Sandwich.”

Thank You!

GTS cover fb
OUR THANKS TO ALL FOR A GREAT GLASS TOWN STAGE INAUGURAL SEASON!

Jefferson3Sandwich MA: It was in 1834 when it was decided Sandwich MA needed to have a civic Town Hall separated from the local church.  A place to gather the community for meetings and activities of the community. The perfect location was next to the local grist mill at the northern end of lower Shawme Pond. In this area a majestic Greek revival  building complete with stage for performances and orations by local towns people was built. The upper Town Hall floor, besides Town Meetings, hosted military balls during the Civil War, school presentations, silent movies, and at the turn of the century actor Joseph Jefferson (the George Clooney of his day)  in Rip Van Winkle his most famous role. Knowing all this history, The Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust, after the renovation and restoration of the building, began to think about the use of the historic stage. What began as an idea in December 2014 has now been realized. 

The Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust (STHPT) has been pleased to present the inaugural season of the Glass Town Stage 2015-16. This inaugural season featured community theater, children’s theater, art shows, movies and concerts. The STHPT proudly partnered with various cultural groups around the area including Cotuit Center for the Arts and the Sandwich Arts Alliance.

Melinda S. Gallant

Thank You!

The Town Hall Preservation Trust has been proud to produce this exciting program.
What began as an idea in December 2014 has now been realized.  There were five simple goals:

  1. Brand the auditorium, for cultural events as Glass Town Stage
  2. See if a “season” would be appealing to the community and could be financially sustainable
  3. Bring in a variety of arts offerings
  4. Partner with other community and regional arts organizations
  5. Support the economy of Sandwich Village.

Thanks to the Board of the “Trust” for supporting this effort and being the sounding board along the way.  Thanks to my fellow sub-committee members, Melinda Gallant and Joe Carlson for their inspiration, time, and efforts and especially to Melinda for her outstanding management skills. Thanks to the many arts organizations we are collaborating with.  It has been fun to negotiate this effort with you.  Special thanks to the Kathy Coggeshall and all the supportive staff at Sandwich Town Hall for their continuous help and support. And most importantly, thanks to the audience for being here.   

Linell M. Grundman

Chair, Glass Town Stage Committee


Sandwich Town Hall is at 130 Main Street, Sandwich, MA 02563

Map & Directions

Tickets will be sold in advance for Glass Town Stage performances and events at:
Sandwich Town Hall, 130 Main Street
and
Splash Stationers, 126 Rte. 6A, Sandwich

Tickets will be sold on the date of the performances/events beginning one hour before the start time. We offer no senior or student discounts with the one exception of a child centered performance. Our facility is fully accessible but we do not have hearing enhancement technology. There is no reserved seating.

For more information email: season@sandwichtownhall.org or call: 508-776-3256 

Thank you for a Great Season!

(check back here for additional updates)


Coming Soon:

Another Classic

SilentMovieNightHeader

With Live Piano Accompaniment!


 For more information on the Glass Town Stage Season–

email:

season@sandwichtownhall.org

or call:

508-776-3256 

Sandwich Town Hall is at 130 Main Street, Sandwich, MA 02563

Map & Directions


The Glass Town Stage Season is sponsored in part by:

Chew-webdon-460-100dpi

DanlWebsterAd460

Splash-ad-100dpi_460

SCT webdon 460 100dpi


RADIO MUSICAL PHOTOS!

September’s Radio Musical was a blast. Thanks to all who came and of course to all the cast and crew. It was a hot time in the old town that night!

Featured were some of Sandwich’s’ favorite local performers including:

  • the Ellis Family singers with the Grand Dame of Sandwich music and Radio Diva Jane Ellis, James (Jimmy) Ellis and Kathy Ellis Knowles.
  • Local real life radio personality Dave Read as the Announcer
  • Selectman Patrick Ellis played the part of the Master of Ceremonies
  • Carol Mc Manus performed in “Carols’ Literary Nook Readings for a Mad World ”
  • Christine Norton reprised her role as Annie
  • Mickie Mc Manus tap danced his way into the hearts of the audience
  • Other locals strutted their talents with the help of Marge Dolby pianist

Classic Silent Films with Live Piano Accompaniment:

The Sandwich Town Hall transforms back into its origins as an early 1900s film auditorium (see articles, below) with special screenings of classic silent films, complete with John Read of Yarmouth playing piano accompaniment and Liisa Niemi of Mansfield offering pre-movie narration dressed as a flapper. John and Lisa are enthusiastic supporters of this unique art style.

Continuing its celebration of the oldest running Town Hall in Massachusetts the volunteer group Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust (the recent winners of the 2011 Massachusetts Historical Commission Award) are presenting this acclaimed film series to support the stewardship of this historical 1834 building.

Tickets are only $5 and are available at:

  • Town Hall, 130 Main St., Monday – Friday from 8:30am to 4:30pm
  • Splash Stationers, 126 Rte 6A, Monday – Saturday from 10am to 5pm. Sunday: noon – 5:00 p.m.

The Piano, the Projectionist and the Preservation

In 1915 or a little later silent movies began to be shown in the Town Hall and a piano, an upright in the Mission style made by Jacob Doll & Sons for the Frederick Piano Company, was acquired. It was played by local residents, Minne Bunker Wimmer, Eva May Harlow, and Mary Haines Morrow, to accompany the silent movies.

The projectionist turned the film by a hand-crank illuminated by a carbon-arc. A primitive generator located in a garage across the street from the Town Hall provided the electricity. Nonetheless using a carbon-arc projector was dangerous business and likely to set a building on fire. To protect the Town Hall from fire, the projectionist was provided with a urinal and required to remain continuously on duty when the carbon-arc was running. It is said that occasionally the engine of the generator would fail, the screen would dim, and boos and hisses would arise from the audience who had paid a nickel to attend.

 READ MORE ABOUT THE HISTORIC PIANO…

The Sandwich Town Hall reflects over 175 years of Sandwich’s history, government and culture as well as the larger issues of State and National life that have had an impact on the Sandwich community. The Town Hall has been in active use as the seat of Town government for every one of those 175 years. There are few towns that can make this claim.

In 2009 the entire building was restored to its former glory. The second floor ballroom is particularly beautiful with its historically accurate stenciling of tan and brown paint and gold leaf, theatrical stage, balcony seating and fully restored historic shuttered windows. Once again, the second floor is used for movies and theatrical productions.

The Sandwich Town Hall, within the newly designated Glass Town Cultural District, was granted a Preservation Award for Rehabilitation & Restoration by the Massachusetts Historical Commission in 2011.

A Classic Star-Studded Evening!

Saturday July 16, 7pm:

Another Classic

SilentMovieNightHeader

With Live Piano Accompaniment!

Enjoy a Star-Studded Evening

with

Charlie Chaplin

and

Lilian & Dorothy Gish!

Our Double Play begins with the classic comedy short:

laughingGas8
Charlie Chaplin plays a dental assistant. What could go wrong?

Laughing Gas is a 1914 film starring Charlie Chaplin. The film is also known as Busy Little Dentist, Down and Out, Laffing Gas, The Dentist, and Tuning His Ivories.

Directed by: Charlie Chaplin
Produced by: Mack Sennett
Starring: Charles Chaplin
Cinematography: Frank D. Williams
Released in: 1914

Next, history’s sweeping drama comes alive in this powerful epic film:

Orphans

Directed by the Legendary

D.W. Griffith

“Orphans of the Storm” (United Artists, 1921), directed by D.W. Griffith, is a grand scale silent melodrama with the central characters being two young sisters (Lillian and Dorothy Gish) caught up in the turmoil of the French Revolution, encountering misery and love along the way.

Much of the film’s success is due to the remarkable acting of the Gish Sisters. Acclaimed for her comedic talents, Dorothy here gives an almost completely serious performance, portraying a blind girl cruelly separated from her beloved sister and forced to beg in the streets. Lillian, her classic face mirroring a myriad of emotions, plays the sibling persecuted by both lecherous aristocrats and rapacious revolutionaries. The scene in which Lillian, in an upper chamber, hears Dorothy singing in the alley below but is unable to reach her, is almost unbearable in its emotional intensity.

 

Live piano accompaniment by John Read!

Pre-movie narration by Liisa Niemi dressed as a flapper

Tickets Only $5!

Available in advance at

Sandwich Town Hall, 130 Main Street
and
Splash Stationers, 126 Rte. 6A, Sandwich

Tickets will be sold on the date of the performances/events beginning one hour before the start time. We offer no senior or student discounts with the one exception of a child centered performance. Our facility is fully accessible but we do not have hearing enhancement technology. There is no reserved seating.

For more information email: season@sandwichtownhall.org or call: 508-776-3256 


The Sandwich Town Hall Silent Film Series

By Anthony Basile, WickedLocal.com & Jonathan Shaw (edited)

In 1915 or a little later silent movies began to be shown in the Town Hall and a piano, an upright in the Mission style made by Jacob Doll & Sons for the Frederick Piano Company, was acquired by the town.  It was played by local residents, Minne Bunker Wimmer, Eva May Harlow, and Mary Haines Morrow, to accompany the silent movies.

The hall’s past as a silent movie venue lives on as the original piano is still in use.  The accompaniment is by Yarmouth resident John Read, an experienced pianist and organist who plays without sheet music.

“I grew up when soap operas had live organ music and memorized the theme songs and styles of the various organists on the shows,” Read said. “At the same time I learned thousands of popular songs. This combination comes in handy when I accompany silent movies in that I can draw upon songs that fit the action, as well as appropriate mood music.”

The shows begin with an introduction to place the classic films in their historical context. Liisa Niemi is an IBM manager by day but in her free time she collects antiques and curios from the 1920s. Drawing on her knowledge of the period, Niemi regularly introduces silent films soundtracked by Read. To add authenticity to her presentation, Niemi wears the clothes of a Twenties flapper.

The plan to bring the town hall back to its movie house past began with Town Hall Preservation Trust member Jonathan Shaw. Upon seeing Read and Niemi’s silent movie showcase, Shaw brought the idea back to the organization, who selected it as a companion to the restored building’s annual event, an old time radio radio-styled variety show.

Between the variety show and the silent film, the town hall has played host to vintage entertainment since its re-opening. The shows’ tickets serve as a source of funds for the continued upkeep of the space. The focus on old-fashioned events draws attention to the building’s history, which stretches back to 1834. The latest renovations brought the building up to date as a community venue while keeping its interior consistent with its original design.

The Silent Film Series is now in its fourth season.

You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown

CharlieBrownPoster600

Friday, Saturday June 17, 18, 7pm

 Sunday June 19, 4pm:

youre-a-good-man-charlie-brown

The classic Charles Schulz family fun musical.

We are pleased to announce our fabulous cast:
Charlie Brown –Woody Mitchell
Lucy- Kim Mitchell
Linus-Brian Berestecky
Schroeder- Bobby Genereau
Patty- Lisa Rudy 
Snoopy- Janet Moore

sthLogo208

Produced by the Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust

Tickets $15

Sandwich Town Hall is at 130 Main Street, Sandwich, MA 02563

Map & Directions

Tickets will be sold in advance for Glass Town Stage performances and events at:
Sandwich Town Hall, 130 Main Street
and
Splash Stationers, 126 Rte. 6A, Sandwich

Tickets will be sold on the date of the performances/events beginning one hour before the start time. We offer no senior or student discounts with the one exception of a child centered performance. Our facility is fully accessible but we do not have hearing enhancement technology. There is no reserved seating.

For more information email: season@sandwichtownhall.org or call: 508-776-3256 

Ten Men of Saugus Plaque Back in Town Hall

10MenSign
(photo credit: Kathy Coggeshall)

After being in storage for an unknown number of years the plaque commemorating the founders of Sandwich, the “Ten Men of Saugus,” is now back up in Town Hall. It graces the second floor landing just outside the door to the main meeting hall.

In a note posted on the Historical Commission website, J. Dillingham wrote: “Where is the red sign with the founding fathers? It is important to have THAT sign in city [sic] hall. Where would the town be without them? We HAVE the sign. Put it up.”

Former Historical Commission member Don Bayley determined that indeed the plaque did hang in Town Hall in the past.

10MenSigninOffice

He found this photo on the internet. Note the caption: “This Plaque of The Ten Men from Saugus, who were the Founders of Sandwich, is on the wall of the Selectmans’s office in City Hall, Town of Sandwich, Massachusetts.” (It looks like the Selectmen had an office with a brick wall back then.)

Don then found the actual plaque in storage at the Deacon-Eldred Building (AKA Sand Hill School). He notified the Historical Commission and member Bill Daley was  instrumental in getting Ted Hamilton from the town to get the plaque out of storage and to re-hang it.

We thank Bill Daley and Ted Hamilton for their work and we thank Mr. Dillingham for making us aware that it was indeed missing.

All of this has spurred this writer to do a bit more research on the Ten Men. Who exactly were they? When did they found Sandwich and why?

For starters, the public record of the Plymouth Court dated April 3, 1637 states:
“it is agreed by the Court that these ten men of Saugus, viz., Edmund Freeman, Henry Feake, Thomas Dexter, Edward Dillingham, William Wood, John Carman, Richard Chadwell, William Almy, Thomas Tupper, and George Knott shall have liberty to view a place to sit down, and have sufficient lands for threescore families, upon the conditions propounded to them by the governor and Mr. Winslow.”

Note that at the time Saugus (today’s Lynn) was part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony; Cape Cod was part of the Plymouth Colony.

In History of Barnstable County, edited by Simeon Deyo, we find this:
“Historians assert, that religious considerations led the ten Saugus (Lynn) pioneers to seek this first plantation of the Cape. (This also confirms that Sandwich was the first English settlement on the Cape.)

What were these “religious considerations?” Why were the Ten Men not happy in Saugus?

We get some clues from Vincent Virga and Dan Spinella in Massachusetts: Mapping the Bay State Through History:
“While the Pilgrims (in Plymouth Colony) were occupied with the problems of survival, the better organized and provisioned Puritans who founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony came with a mission, to establish their own shining ‘citty [sic] upon a Hill,’ free of the sin and corruption of the land and society they were leaving. They moved quickly to establish their political and religious – and eventually, geographical – authority, with confidence based on their religious faith and the later economic success that they took as a sign of divine consent.”

Historian Rebecca Beatrice Brooks adds this:
“Religion and government were deeply intertwined in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and only the most devout Puritans could participate in governmental affairs, according to the book Politics and Religion in the United States:
“While everyone in the community was a member of a congregation and was expected to attend services and support the church, only those who went through the arduous process of demonstrating their spiritual regeneration could become full-covenant members, thus gaining a say in both ecclesiastical and secular government. The civil government had authority over everyone in the community, but was controlled by the minority of the population that had achieved full church membership.”

And so this is most likely why our Ten Men wanted out.

“Whatever their motives, after deliberation they concluded that the Plymouth colony could be no more stringent than the Massachusetts, nor present more obstacles to their aspirations; so they sought and obtained permission from the colony of Plymouth to locate a plantation at Shaume, now Sandwich.” (History of Barnstable County)

“The settlement at Sandwich was projected by Mr. Edmund Freeman and others who, April 3 of this year, obtained a grant from the Colony of Plymouth and at once with a large number of families from Lynn, Duxbury and Plymouth but chiefly from Lynn, the ancient Saugus, removed to the location designated. The settlement was begun this year under very favorable auspices although it was not regularly incorporated as a town until about two years after.” (Frederick Freeman, History of Cape Cod: The Annals of Barnstable County)

Who were the Ten Men? Read about them here:

Edmund Freeman

Edward Dillingham

Thomas Tupper

Thomas Dexter

and HERE