Category Archives: Press

Entertainment returns to Sandwich Town Hall

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Theater — and other entertainment — is coming back to Sandwich on a regular basis through the inaugural season of the Glass Town Stage at Sandwich Town Hall.

Through planning by the Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust following the building’s renovation, a schedule of 14 events over the next year — including partner events with Cotuit Center for the Arts and the Sandwich Arts Alliance — will help bring back performances to a historic stage. This season includes community theater, children’s theater, art shows, movies and concerts.

A press release notes the history of the upper floor of town hall, which has hosted military balls during the Civil War, school presentations, silent movies, and visiting actors.

That season begins at 7 p.m. Sept. 19 with “The 3rd (not so) Annual Sandwich Town Hall Musical Radio Show” that will include singing, dancing, comic routines and sketches as a fundraiser for the trust organization. Among the local performers: the Ellis Family singers with Jane Ellis, James (Jimmy) Ellis and Kathy Ellis Knowles; local radio personality Dave Read; selectman Patrick Ellis; Carol McManus, Christine Norton and Mickie McManus; and pianist Marge Dolby. Tickets: $15.

The rest of the season will include Oct 17, John Ford’s silent western film “The Iron Horse” with live piano accompaniment; Nov. 20-22, “Cotuit on the Road Presents Anthony Teixeira Sings Tony Bennett Duets”; Dec. 12: “Sandwich Soul for the Holidays Special”; Cabaret Weekend Jan. 16-18; Feb. 21, “Cotuit on the Road Presents an Oklahoma Sing Along with staged reading”; March 19-20, Think Spring Art Show; April 16, silent film “Doomsday” starring Gary Cooper with live piano accompaniment; April 17, “Town Hall Preservation Trust Spring Piano Tea: Celebrates Poetry Month”; May 21, “May Music Fest”; June 18-20, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown”; July 16, silent film “The Wind,” starring Lillian Gish with live piano accompaniment; and Aug. 20, Cape Cod Theatre Company presents The Harwich Junior Theatre Kids.

Town Hall Radio Musical Show September 19

RADIO MUSICAL PHOTOS!

September’s Radio Musical was a blast. Thanks to all who came and of course to all the cast and crew. It was a hot time in the old town that night!

Featured were some of Sandwich’s’ favorite local performers including:

  • the Ellis Family singers with the Grand Dame of Sandwich music and Radio Diva Jane Ellis, James (Jimmy) Ellis and Kathy Ellis Knowles.
  • Local real life radio personality Dave Read as the Announcer
  • Selectman Patrick Ellis played the part of the Master of Ceremonies
  • Carol Mc Manus performed in “Carols’ Literary Nook Readings for a Mad World ”
  • Christine Norton reprised her role as Annie
  • Mickie Mc Manus tap danced his way into the hearts of the audience
  • Other locals strutted their talents with the help of Marge Dolby pianist

capenewsnet

When: Sat Sep 19th
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Where: Sandwich Town Hall | 145 Main Street | Sandwich

ENTERPRISE STAFF

The Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust will present “The 3rd (not so) Annual Sandwich Town Hall Radio Musical Show” on Saturday, September 19, at 7 PM as the inaugural performance on the Glass Town Stage at town hall.

This lively musical variety show will feature local town personalities singing, dancing and doing comedic routines as a “rhubarb” radio show. The format of the program will be that of a local old time radio show complete with commercials, master of ceremonies, a larger-than-life announcer and bossy stage hands, Bob King and Tobin Wirt, telling the audience when to applaud and when to laugh.

Featured will be some of Sandwich’s favorite local performers including the Ellis Family singers with the grand dame of Sandwich music and radio diva Jane Ellis, James (Jimmy) Ellis and Kathy Ellis Knowles. Local real-life radio personality Dave Read will play the announcer and selectman Patrick Ellis will play the part of the master of ceremonies.

Performers also include Carol McManus in “Carol’s Literary Nook Readings for a Mad World,” Christine Norton reprising her role as Annie, and Mickie McManus with tap dancing. Other locals will be showcasing their talents with the help of pianist Marge Dolby.

Tickets are $15 and are available at Sandwich Town Hall and Splash Stationers.

The mission of the Sandwich Town Hall Preservation Trust is to support the continued stewardship of the town hall, to assist the town manager and staff as a resource for volunteers, events, and programs, to provide, if feasible, funds for special purposes, and to make recommendations for the perpetual protection and enhancement of the Sandwich Town Hall as a major cultural, functional, and historic asset of the Town of Sandwich and the commonwealth. The building features community events, meetings, movies, shows, talks and tours.

The Lodger @ Sandwich Town Hall

capenewsnetWhen: Sat Nov 10th
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Where: Sandwich Town Hall | 145 Main Street | Sandwich

After the success of last year’s silent screening of Nosferatu, Sandwich Town Hall, restored to its original 1800s structure, has taken upon themselves to continue the tradition. Alfred Hitchcock’s, The Lodger, is playing tonight, a suspense thriller. It involves a serial killer on the loose in London murdering blond haired women.

The other films in the Sandwich Silent Series will be Sunrise with Janet Gaynor which will be screened on February 9 and Charlie Chapman’s Modern Times on April 20, both shown at 7PM.

Tickets for all movies in the series are now  available for at Town Hall, 130 Main St. from 8:30 – 4:30, Monday – Friday and at Splash Stationers, 126 Rte 6A, 10 – 5, Monday – Saturday. Tickets are $5 per show and all funds will be used to benefit the 1834 Sandwich Town Hall.

Thornton Burgess Society Gala @ Sandwich Town Hall

capenewsnetWhen: Sat Oct 20th
5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Where: Sandwich Town Hall | 145 Main Street | Sandwich

The Thornton W. Burgess Society’s annual fundraiser “An Evening for Green Briar” will be held at the Historic Sandwich Town Hall on Saturday, October 20 from 5:30 to 8:30 PM.

The evening will begin with wine and hors d’oeuvres and a Silent Auction with items ranging from area restaurant gift certificates to Boston Duck Tour and Cape Cod Symphony tickets, to limited edition prints and oil paintings.
Momo’s Food Emporium of East Sandwich will be catering a buffet sit-down dinner with; desserts will feature some of the Green Briar Jam Kitchen’s jams and jellies.
Auctioneer Arthur Ratsy will auction off the Live Auction items, which include Four Loge Tickets for a Boston Bruins Game plus choice of a Zamboni ride or Bench Assistant experience. Carver Al Jordan, who has been named New York Wildlife Sculptor of the Year multiple times, has donated a one of a kind work of art.  Another item up for bid is spending a day with Representative Randy Hunt at the Massachusetts State House, Boston, which includes lunch with the Representative.
This gala, not to be missed, also features acclaimed Cape-area jazz musicians Roy Campbell, Daniel LaPage, Laird Boles and Michael Dunford in the Cape All Star Jazz Band. Their prodigious credits include stints with artists ranging from Milton Berle to Bo Diddley.
Tickets are $75 per person and can be purchased by phone at (508)888-6870 or on the day of the event at the Sandwich Town Hall. All of the proceeds from the fundraiser will be used to further the development of the Thornton Burgess Society’s Educational Programs. The Society would like to thank our event sponsors: Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank Charitable Foundation Trust, Oyster Harbors Marine, The Horsley Witten Group, and Sunderland Printing.

“Twelve Angry Men” @ Sandwich Town Hall

capenewsnet

When: Fri Sep 28th
7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Where: Sandwich Town Hall | 145 Main Street | Sandwich

In the first of what is hoped to be many happy collaborations, the Cotuit Center for the Arts is bringing a performance of “Twelve Angry Men” to the Sandwich Town Hall stage Friday, September 28 at 7:30 PM.

Reginald Rose wrote this acclaimed play as well as the 1950’s TV drama it is based on. In 1957, shortly after this powerful story of human nature was performed on television, it would become a highly acclaimed movie.
The story is simple but profound: twelve men sit in a court house room in 1954 deciding what their verdict will be concerning a homicide case.
Tickets for the play are $15 and can be purchased in advance through Cotuit Center for the Arts by phoning their box office at 508-428-0633 or at cotuitcenterforthearts.org.  There will be a concession provided by the Friends of Sandwich Town Hall at the performance.

Nosferatu Haunts Sandwich Town Hall

Back By Popular Demand: Saturday, October 12, 2013, 7PM

From: The insider’s guide to going out on Cape Cod

By: Sam Houghton, February 17, 2012

On Saturday, February 18, the Sandwich Town Hall transformed back into its origins as an early 1900s film auditorium with a special screening of the silent classic film Nosferatu, complete with a live piano accompaniment.

Continuing its celebration of the oldest running Town Hall in Massachusetts the volunteer group Friends of Sandwich Town Hall (the recent winners of the 2011 Massachusetts Historical Commission Award) presented the film, accompanied by John Read on the piano.

Dressed in traditional flapper garb, silent film enthusiast Liisa Niemi gave a brief introduction on the history of the genre and the story and themes of Nosferatu.

Nosferatu dates back to 1920s Germany when director F. M. Murnau adapted, without authorization, Bram Stroker’s Dracula, portraying the haunting story of a young Mr. Hutter and his stay at the vampire Nosferatu’s eerie mansion in Transylvania.

Although this first-ever vampire movie may feel slow compared to those made later in the century, Nosferatu is rife with historical significance.

Around the same time that Nosferatu was released, Sandwich Town Hall was a hot bed for silent films.

“This is our way of bringing back the spirit of community to the Town Hall,” said Friends of Sandwich Town Hall member Bill Daley.

“We have never done this before, but it should be fun for the whole community.”

Whether or not Nosferatu originally played in the Hall, Daly is not sure, but he is pleased with the selection of a film regarded as one of the best in the silent genre.

Pianist John Read, a Yarmouth Port local, has over 30 years experience entertaining as a musician. He attributes his success as a silent film accompanist to his passionate knowledge of 30s and 40s pop songs and the live organ music from early soap operas.

Read and Niemi have hosted silent movie events for the past few years around the state. In addition to her introduction, Niemi will share her collection of antiques and vintage clothing at the event, a passion that she gained from her grandmother, an original flapper girl and antique collector.

The Friends of Sandwich Town Hall is a group created to maximize the potential of community building within the Hall. After a recent restoration project to the building, the group aims to host regular events similar to the viewing of Nosferatu.

Back By Popular Demand:  Saturday, October 12, 2013, 7PM

More Info

In Sandwich, ‘Our Town’ will help preserve Town Hall

 

By Craig Salters
Posted Sep 13, 2011

SANDWICH —

Sandwich spent a considerable amount of time, talent and treasure to restore the historic Town Hall and a group of residents is organizing to help keep the building in tiptop condition.
“We’re just starting,” is how Selectwoman Linnell Grundman describes the status of Friends of Town Hall, which will dedicate itself to both maintaining and improving the building.
Such a citizens group was always intended by the committee that oversaw restoration efforts, Grundman said. The idea is to raise funds for some items, such as additional lighting or backstage curtains, that are certainly wants but might not necessarily be town needs in this time of budget uncertainty.
“We want to maintain and enhance the space,” said Grundman, who added that the group has yet to officially meet but that those seeking more information could contact Patrick Ellis.
While it may be new, the preservation group already has a fundraiser planned for it thanks to Theatre of Sandwich, in which Grundman is also involved. The theater group will present a staged reading of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” Saturday, Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. at Town Hall. Tickets are $15 and all funds raised will go to the Friends of Town Hall.
The classic story of life in a small New England town at the turn of the 20th century was chosen, Grundman said, because its themes might resonate with a Sandwich audience. In addition, she said, the play does not require sets and is instead reliant upon its use of language. “The story is told through the words,” Grundman said.
As a result, the staged reading offers a chance to demonstrate what the restored Town Hall has to offer residents. Said Grundman: “It’s a great piece to produce in a hall that was built for live sound.”
Built in 1834, Sandwich Town Hall was one of the first town halls built in the Commonwealth. For decades the second floor meeting room served the town as the site of town meetings and was also used for school performances, lectures, dances and other community activities. Beginning in the 1930’s, it was used for the storage of public records.
The building was rededicated in October of 2010 following a 15-month, $3.1 million restoration project financed through funds from the Community Preservation Act.
Sandwich selectmen began holding their regularly scheduled meetings there this spring.

Sandwich spent a considerable amount of time, talent and treasure to restore the historic Town Hall and a group of residents is organizing to help keep the building in tiptop condition.
“We’re just starting,” is how Selectwoman Linnell Grundman describes the status of Friends of Town Hall, which will dedicate itself to both maintaining and improving the building.
Such a citizens group was always intended by the committee that oversaw restoration efforts, Grundman said. The idea is to raise funds for some items, such as additional lighting or backstage curtains, that are certainly wants but might not necessarily be town needs in this time of budget uncertainty.
“We want to maintain and enhance the space,” said Grundman, who added that the group has yet to officially meet but that those seeking more information could contact Patrick Ellis.
While it may be new, the preservation group already has a fundraiser planned for it thanks to Theatre of Sandwich, in which Grundman is also involved. The theater group will present a staged reading of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” Saturday, Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. at Town Hall. Tickets are $15 and all funds raised will go to the Friends of Town Hall.
The classic story of life in a small New England town at the turn of the 20th century was chosen, Grundman said, because its themes might resonate with a Sandwich audience. In addition, she said, the play does not require sets and is instead reliant upon its use of language. “The story is told through the words,” Grundman said.
As a result, the staged reading offers a chance to demonstrate what the restored Town Hall has to offer residents. Said Grundman: “It’s a great piece to produce in a hall that was built for live sound.”
Built in 1834, Sandwich Town Hall was one of the first town halls built in the Commonwealth. For decades the second floor meeting room served the town as the site of town meetings and was also used for school performances, lectures, dances and other community activities. Beginning in the 1930’s, it was used for the storage of public records.
The building was rededicated in October of 2010 following a 15-month, $3.1 million restoration project financed through funds from the Community Preservation Act.
Sandwich selectmen began holding their regularly scheduled meetings there this spring.

Read more: In Sandwich, ‘Our Town’ will help preserve Town Hall – – Wicked Local – Cape Cod https://www.wickedlocal.com/capecod/news/x371954413/In-Sandwich-Our-Town-will-help-preserve-Town-Hall#ixzz21EnDpemM

Sandwich Town Hall renovations near completion

By Silene Gordon
Posted Sep 01, 2010

Sandwich —

perlmutterFifteen months after the first hammer was swung to renovate Sandwich Town Hall, there will be a rededication ceremony to mark the completion of the $3.1 million historic renovation project. The ceremony, scheduled for Oct. 2, will allow the community at large the first opportunity to see the newly restored space. “People are very interested in what’s going on. There’s a lot of enthusiasm around this project,” says Frank Pannorfi, a former Sandwich selectmen who has been a driving force behind the project from its inception. “Things are at fever pitch around here right now. “We want to open the doors and say to people, ‘It’s yours. Go in and see what you have here.’ It becomes the peoples’ building.”

A task force was established to arrange the rededication ceremony and organizers are seeking volunteers to help on the day. The task force is hoping to attract two dozen volunteers to serve as monitors during the rededication ceremony as well as tour guides during the event. “This type of rededication has been in my mind for five years now. I’ve always envisioned the restored building having this rededication event,” says Pannorfi, who is part of the Town Hall Restoration Committee among others. “The building is such an historic piece of Sandwich, Cape Cod, Massachusetts and United States history. It deserves a day like that.”

A piece of the past with close ties to modern day governance, Sandwich Town Hall was built in 1834, making it one of the first town halls in the Commonwealth, according to historians. The building is believed to be one of the first of its kind to be built following the vote that ratified the separation of church and state in Massachusetts in 1833. Having served as a seat of town government as well as a gathering place for townspeople over the years, the building is fondly looked upon as a place worth saving. Although the project began just last year, the sentiment surrounding the refurbishing of the building is not new. Pannorfi remembers former Sandwich selectmen Patrick Ellis raising the issue of a renovation project on the building a decade ago. “It was 2000 and Patrick was talking about this and I wanted to know why we should spend $650,000 to renovate an old building. Forty-five minutes later I knew why,” says Pannorfi. “I started to understand the historic significance, the economic significance, and it all made sense. I have been a proponent ever since, along with the selectmen, and it’s still my baby.”

Town Meeting initially approved the use of Community Preservation Act funds in 2005 to pay for renovations to begin on the 176-year-old structure. Work began in June 2009 and coincided with various town offices being relocated to the Oak Crest Cove facility off of Quaker Meetinghouse Road. Once the project is completed, the town manager as well as other departments will move back into the space.

In addition to contributing aesthetic and historic significance to the building, the renovation project may even provide a revenue source once completed. Discussions have included using the upstairs of the building as a rentable space, with the passage of Article 14 allowing for a revolving fund for the town, capped at $10,000, for access to the newly rehabbed second-floor meeting room. Additionally, voters approved spending $100,000 to restore historic stenciling located on the ceiling of the building, as well as installation of a stage curtain and wood floors to bring the building back to its original form.

“There are many reasons to come to Sandwich. When you do, I believe you accept part of the stewardship about preserving its history,” says Pannorfi, who applauds the many people involved who have made the project successful. Local historian and Town Hall Restoration Committee member Jonathan Shaw has authored a pamphlet on historic events tied to Sandwich Town Hall, which will be made available at the rededication. The hope is to use proceeds from its sales as a fundraiser for the yet-to-be-formed Friends of Sandwich Town Hall. Says Pannorfi, “The more you learn about this building, the more you want to know. There are some marvelous stories that people should know about.”

Credit: PHOTO GALLERY: Sandwich Town Hall renovations near completion – – Wicked Local – Cape Cod

Remaking history at Sandwich Town Hall

By George Brennan
gbrennan@capecodonline.com
March 25, 2010

SANDWICH  When voters approved the restoration of the venerable 1834 town hall, there was fear that costs might skyrocket because of the building’s age. But with the home-stretch of the year-long project in sight, architects and builders say the renovation remains on time, on budget and the only surprises have been historical finds.

The most recent discovery, said Ryan Foster, an architect with the McGinley Kaslow & Associates, is that the entrance doors are originals. In removing panels on the doors for the restoration, North Bennet Street School of Carpentry found the signature of Solomon G. Howland and 1834 written in chalk. “The panels were protecting the signature,” Foster said.

Howland is the son of Ellis Howland, who built the town hall and is from a family of builders responsible for some historic homes in the village, Jonathan Shaw, a local historian who serves on the building committee, said.

The signature spans about 6 feet on the large wooden doors. “That for me evokes the pride he had in building them,” Shaw said.

Town employees also found an old ship’s lantern when they were packing up to move out. That lantern is being restored and will be featured in the entryway, said Wendall Kaslow, the project’s principal architect.

On a tour of the building Tuesday, town leaders and a couple of visitors got a peek inside the renovation project, which is on budget and time, Kaslow said.

The windows are still out and two signature columns have been removed, but the architect and contractor say the $3.1 million project should be done by July 31.

Once again, the building will house the town manager, town accountant and town treasurer’s offices, which are temporarily located at Oak Crest Cove. The first-floor offices have been framed and are ready for finish work. On the second floor, the meeting room that’s been closed to the public and relegated to a glorified closet since public access laws went into effect, is being restored. Work is under way to refinish the maple floor and provide access to the room with an elevator. The room, which spans the length of the building, served as the location of town meetings for more than 100 years, Shaw said.
The town hall, possibly the first in the state, was built within a year of a Massachusetts law that emphasized the separation of church and state, Shaw said.

Meanwhile, the town hopes to use contingency funds to restore stencil work on the auditorium ceiling, Frank Pannorfi, a former selectman and advocate for the project, said. Andrew Ladygo, a renowned preservationist who has worked on historic buildings including the Massachusetts Statehouse, is chipping away paint on the ceiling in a pain-staking process to reveal the pattern.

But it was perhaps the basement that most impressed visitors. What was once a crawl space is now supported by concrete pillars and a more traditional basement — albeit one that requires walking hunched over. “It was a wet, muddy mess down here,” assistant Town Manager Doug Lapp said. Chris Raye, the project’s general contractor Builders Systems Inc., said workers had to remove fill from the basement one 5-gallon bucket at a time. “It was a nightmare excavating 3 to 4 feet of mud,” he said.

All in all, though, Raye said the project has thrown few curve balls. David and Suzanne Goehringer, two Sandwich residents who were invited guests for the tour, said they were impressed by the work paid for by community preservation funds.

“The restoration is amazing,” David Goehringer said. “I drive by two or three times a day and I had no idea what was happening inside.”