In Sandwich, ‘Our Town’ will help preserve Town Hall

 

By Craig Salters
Posted Sep 13, 2011

SANDWICH —

Sandwich spent a considerable amount of time, talent and treasure to restore the historic Town Hall and a group of residents is organizing to help keep the building in tiptop condition.
“We’re just starting,” is how Selectwoman Linnell Grundman describes the status of Friends of Town Hall, which will dedicate itself to both maintaining and improving the building.
Such a citizens group was always intended by the committee that oversaw restoration efforts, Grundman said. The idea is to raise funds for some items, such as additional lighting or backstage curtains, that are certainly wants but might not necessarily be town needs in this time of budget uncertainty.
“We want to maintain and enhance the space,” said Grundman, who added that the group has yet to officially meet but that those seeking more information could contact Patrick Ellis.
While it may be new, the preservation group already has a fundraiser planned for it thanks to Theatre of Sandwich, in which Grundman is also involved. The theater group will present a staged reading of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” Saturday, Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. at Town Hall. Tickets are $15 and all funds raised will go to the Friends of Town Hall.
The classic story of life in a small New England town at the turn of the 20th century was chosen, Grundman said, because its themes might resonate with a Sandwich audience. In addition, she said, the play does not require sets and is instead reliant upon its use of language. “The story is told through the words,” Grundman said.
As a result, the staged reading offers a chance to demonstrate what the restored Town Hall has to offer residents. Said Grundman: “It’s a great piece to produce in a hall that was built for live sound.”
Built in 1834, Sandwich Town Hall was one of the first town halls built in the Commonwealth. For decades the second floor meeting room served the town as the site of town meetings and was also used for school performances, lectures, dances and other community activities. Beginning in the 1930’s, it was used for the storage of public records.
The building was rededicated in October of 2010 following a 15-month, $3.1 million restoration project financed through funds from the Community Preservation Act.
Sandwich selectmen began holding their regularly scheduled meetings there this spring.

Sandwich spent a considerable amount of time, talent and treasure to restore the historic Town Hall and a group of residents is organizing to help keep the building in tiptop condition.
“We’re just starting,” is how Selectwoman Linnell Grundman describes the status of Friends of Town Hall, which will dedicate itself to both maintaining and improving the building.
Such a citizens group was always intended by the committee that oversaw restoration efforts, Grundman said. The idea is to raise funds for some items, such as additional lighting or backstage curtains, that are certainly wants but might not necessarily be town needs in this time of budget uncertainty.
“We want to maintain and enhance the space,” said Grundman, who added that the group has yet to officially meet but that those seeking more information could contact Patrick Ellis.
While it may be new, the preservation group already has a fundraiser planned for it thanks to Theatre of Sandwich, in which Grundman is also involved. The theater group will present a staged reading of Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” Saturday, Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. at Town Hall. Tickets are $15 and all funds raised will go to the Friends of Town Hall.
The classic story of life in a small New England town at the turn of the 20th century was chosen, Grundman said, because its themes might resonate with a Sandwich audience. In addition, she said, the play does not require sets and is instead reliant upon its use of language. “The story is told through the words,” Grundman said.
As a result, the staged reading offers a chance to demonstrate what the restored Town Hall has to offer residents. Said Grundman: “It’s a great piece to produce in a hall that was built for live sound.”
Built in 1834, Sandwich Town Hall was one of the first town halls built in the Commonwealth. For decades the second floor meeting room served the town as the site of town meetings and was also used for school performances, lectures, dances and other community activities. Beginning in the 1930’s, it was used for the storage of public records.
The building was rededicated in October of 2010 following a 15-month, $3.1 million restoration project financed through funds from the Community Preservation Act.
Sandwich selectmen began holding their regularly scheduled meetings there this spring.

Read more: In Sandwich, ‘Our Town’ will help preserve Town Hall – – Wicked Local – Cape Cod http://www.wickedlocal.com/capecod/news/x371954413/In-Sandwich-Our-Town-will-help-preserve-Town-Hall#ixzz21EnDpemM